Reviews

Review: I Live a Life Like Yours by Jan Grue Rating 86%

Review: I Live a Life Like Yours by Jan Grue

Jan Grue has written several books prior to this memoir though it always explores the theme of embodiment. I Live a Life Like Yours might just give the context behind why this is the focus of his work. Having been diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy at the age of three, this is a memoir that focuses on this diagnosis and what it means as far as everyday living goes for Jan. A tale about love as much as it is about grief, suffering and a world that is full of obstacles for those not considered “normal.”

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Review: The Scorpion’s Head by Hilde Vandermeeren Rating 66%

Review: The Scorpion’s Head by Hilde Vandermeeren

From Children’s and YA writer, Hilde Vandermeeren, comes a fast-paced vivid thriller that will sit inside your head for long after you have put it down. The Scorpion’s Head is freshly out, published by Pushkin Press and translated by Larea Watkinson. The fourth book in the acclaimed Walter Presents Library, this fascinating psychological smorgasbord of plot, character, intrigue and determination will eat you up whole.

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Review: Maybe I Don’t Belong Here by David Harewood Rating 95%

Review: Maybe I Don’t Belong Here by David Harewood

When David Harewood was twenty-three, just as his acting career was taking off after leaving RADA, he had what he now understands to be a case of psychosis, and ended up being sectioned under the Mental Health Act. He was physically restrained by six police officers, sedated, then hospitalised and transferred to a locked ward where he was force fed sedatives such as Diazepam.

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Review: Girl One by Sara Flannery Murphy Rating 75%

Review: Girl One by Sara Flannery Murphy

Girl One is the second novel from Sara Flannery Murphy after The Possessions was published in 2017. A twisty supernatural thriller about female power and the bonds of sisterhood, this novel follows Josephine Morrow as Girl One, the first of nine “Miracle Babies” conceived without male DNA, raised on an experimental commune known as the Homestead.

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Review: Brickwork – A Biography of The Arches by David Bratchpiece and Kirstin Innes Rating 80%

Review: Brickwork – A Biography of The Arches by David Bratchpiece and Kirstin Innes

Brickwork: A Biography of The Arches is the first book that has focussed on The Arches from its humble beginnings as the potential for an art venue, which soon became the venue that DJs such as Carl Cox, Daft Punk and David Guetta were all keen to perform in. Having attended several arts performances, gigs and club nights in this Glasgow institution this book throws me back into those gigs, the smells, the bass, the unkempt undergroundness of it all in the early noughties. Offering an uncompromised flavour of the Glasgow art scene, whether it was the nightclub, the theatre, the creative hub, it was one of the most significant and pivotal venues in Scotland, Britain and Europe: for almost 25 years, The Arches was the beating heart of Glasgow.

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Review: Geese – Projector Rating 63%

Review: Geese – Projector

As soon as I encounter the band Geese it’s automatic to trail back to that beautifully brilliant project of Emma Smith’s and Vince Sipprell’s. which ultimately means any other is geared for failure, unless they absolutely astound. Geese is another band with the same name who actually begin and ends in Brooklyn, as a project between friends to build a home studio out of a basement. Their debut album Projector (out via Partisan/Play It Again Sam digitally on Oct 29th, and then on LP/CD/CAS on Dec 3) is born from the same ambition: make music by any means necessary. Despite liking this ethos, their DIY indie sound is not quite up to scratch to be associating with this bird.

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Review: Chelsea Carmichael – The River Doesn’t Like Strangers Rating 73%

Review: Chelsea Carmichael – The River Doesn’t Like Strangers

Saxophonist Chelsea Carmichael this week released their debut album whilst being signed to Shabaka Hutchings’ (The Comet Is Coming, Sons of Kemet, Shabaka and the Ancestors) new label Native Rebel Recordings. The River Doesn’t Like Strangers is a myriad of genres and influences as you listen to the nine sublime tracks that swerve us through jazz, funk and world music.

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Review: No Time To Die Rating 65%

Review: No Time To Die

Enjoying a jaunt around Europe, Madeleine Swan (Lea Seydoux) and James Bond (Daniel Craig) find themselves caught up in a race between two rival organisations who want to steal a secretly developed chemical weapon. Blofeld (Christoph Waltz) must somehow be leading the resurgent Spectre, yet he remains imprisoned and the mystery leader behind their opponents is yet to reveal themselves…

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Review: Rufus Wainwright, Usher Hall Rating 90%

Review: Rufus Wainwright, Usher Hall

Due to a Google Maps glitch, which led to me and my friend pacing repeatedly up and down Lothian road like a pair of expectant fathers, we missed the first song. When we finally find the venue (turns out it was the big dome lit up like Blackpool) Rufus Wainwright is just about to launch into his second number.

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Review: Laura Marling, Queens Hall Rating 65%

Review: Laura Marling, Queens Hall

Sadly Laura Marling’s long awaited Song For Our Daughter Edinburgh gig was somewhat overshadowed by the chaos of fire alarms, and chaos getting in and out of the venue, a nightmare for any artist. However, despite the stress of the event, she pulled it back together with a fine set of calm reflection that sits on the ten track LP.

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