Books

Review: All The Names Given by Raymond Antrobus Rating 73%

Review: All The Names Given by Raymond Antrobus

Ground-breaking, visceral and transformative, Raymond Antrobus’ new collection meets any high expectation after his acclaimed much-lauded debut collection. His exploratory investigation into language, miscommunication, place, and memory is noted in All The Names Given, while simultaneously getting us to the think about accessibility and inclusivity.

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Review: The Woman from Uruguay by Pedro Mairal Rating 92%

Review: The Woman from Uruguay by Pedro Mairal

Pedro Mairal, born in Buenos Aires, dropped out of school at 18 and followed his passion for reading and writing. He would spend all day in the cafeteria absorbing the works of Borges, Salinger, Neruda and others. He viewed it as a way to learn the tricks and secrets of writing. He compares the skill of telling a story without giving every detail to a Picasso painting.

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Review: Here Is The Beehive by Sarah Crossan Rating 85%

Review: Here Is The Beehive by Sarah Crossan

Sarah Crossan, an Irish author, has written eleven novels between 2012 and 2020, and is noted for her commitment to young adult writing. Her YA novel, One, published in 2015, received four awards and the German edition of her novel Moonrise received an award in 2020. Here Is The Beehive is Sarah Crossans’ first adult novel, published in 2020 by Bloomsbury and shortlisted for the An Post Irish Book Award.

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Review: Nina Simone’s Gum by Warren Ellis Rating 77%

Review: Nina Simone’s Gum by Warren Ellis

Faber have recently published a rare text by Warren Ellis, a book that considers the spiritualism that can exist within belongings that represent a moment, a pivotal point in someone’s career or even just a rare situation or privileged positions. Nina Simone’s Gum is a book precisely all about the preservation of a gum, which is actually a preservation of a moment and the legacy of this iconic and talented musician.

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Review: Misfits – A Personal Manifesto by Michaela Coel Rating 88%

Review: Misfits – A Personal Manifesto by Michaela Coel

From the refreshing and intimate mind of the creator and star of I May Destroy You and Chewing Gum comes a passionate lecture about not fitting in, that will allow you to see moths in a whole new light. Misfits: A Personal Manifesto is a published version of the MacTaggart Lecture as part of Edinburgh’s TV Festival that Michaela Cole had to deliver in 2018, and as such holds many nuances but mostly opens up the room for honest, open and engaging provocations.

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Review: Be guid tae yer Mammy by Emma Grae Rating 65%

Review: Be guid tae yer Mammy by Emma Grae

From journalist and fiction writer, Emma Grae, comes this moral tale of legacy, family values, relationships and secrets that are intrinsic to many families. Be guid ta yer Mammy, published by Unbound, is a relative, life-affirming tale set in Glasgow, written in Scots, that opens the door for you to think about family dynamics, illness and the significance of living life.

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Vivien Churney: It chronicles the lives of two women who faced lives of conflict and suffering from WW2 onwards

The daughter of a Holocaust survivor has shared her mother’s story in a novel, Bound by the Scars We Share, which has been published by Troubador. Vivien Churney, from Liverpool, has written this novel tracing the lives of two young women surviving World War II, which is based on true events experienced by her mother, Sabine Spector. 

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Review: What You Can See From Here by Mariana Leky Rating 74%

Review: What You Can See From Here by Mariana Leky

Mariana Leky’s What You Can See From Here, a bestseller in Germany, has only just been translated to English by Tess Lewis, also letting us in on this hidden gem. A novel about superstition, absurdities, loss and love, Leky’s novel is an epic tale that spans the lives of Selma and Luise, and their place within their community.

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Review: Piranesi by Susanna Clarke Rating 96%

Review: Piranesi by Susanna Clarke

Shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction, Susanna Clarke is finally back on the literary scene with Piranesi. It has been 17 years since Clarke’s Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, a debut novel that was unlike anything this reviewer has read. Now, in 2020/2021, Clarke is back with a novel just as strange and enchanting – Piranesi.

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Review: The Marketplace of Ideas by Stefan Mohamed Rating 90%

Review: The Marketplace of Ideas by Stefan Mohamed

This is my first time reading any of Stefan Mohamed’s words and poems and what an introduction it was. I want more. The Marketplace of Ideas when read is a collective statement on the visible horrors of modern technology, communication, existence and self expression. Albeit in a highly entertaining way. Anyone of these poems is so dense, assertive, dark, illuminating and comical than the entirety of Black Mirror. It’s a seriously good read.

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